March 10, 2015 Comments (0) Travel Guides

Wreck Dives in the Salish Sea

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The Puget Sound is chock full of excellent wreck dives. Here’s my collection of the coolest wrecks that are a must visit.

 

 Interactive Map of all the Dives

 

 

The Diamond Knot

Hooking the Diamond Knot

This is one of the best dives in Washington State, and the premiere wreck dive on this list. The nutrient rich currents cause this wreck to be absolutely covered in marine life, but beware! The currents are vicious, don’t even consider diving on the flood. This is a very advanced dive, but very rewarding. The Diamond Knot sits between 80′ and 125′ deep just off of Tongue Point.

 

Dungeness Spit Crane


No one seems to be sure of the history of this wreck, but sitting on the bottom of the straits is an old 130′ crane boom and A frame. It is now home to an amazing array of marine life. As with the Diamond Knot wreck, the currents in this area can be extremely hazardous. One of the favorite dives of the straits.

 

Edmonds Underwater Park

Edmonds Underwater Park

The most popular dive site in the Puget Sound, Edmonds Underwater Park is easily accessible from shore (with excellent shore-side facilities provided by the city parks department) and contains a large number of placed wrecks in shallow water.

These wrecks have been sunk at regular intervals over the years, making this a great place to learn about deterioration and the growth of marine life. The Edmonds Underwater Park is the best place around to learn about wreck diving.

 

Maury Island Barges

Maury Island Barges

A pleasant dive site consisting of several barges and pleasure craft, sunk in 40′-60′ of water. Sheltered water and lots of marine life make this another excellent dive spot for beginners. Visibility suffers somewhat in the summer, but is excellent during the fall and winter.

 

The Comet and The Orca



The Comet is an extremely easy to access shore dive, just off of the Port Hadlock boat ramp. The 127′ tug is lying on it’s starboard side, in 15′-40′ of water. This is a great dive for beginners.

The Orca is a 45′ Tug sitting upright in 65′ of water. It sank in 1999, and is still in remarkably good condition. A fun, easy wreck to explore, and The Comet nearby makes a good second, shallow dive.

 

Need more dives in the Northwest?

Check out Northwest Wreck Dives by Scott Boyd and Jeff Carr, available on Amazon.